URR won't boot with the faulty drive connected

Hi all, I have the following problem. I have a faulty drive, which spins and shows in BIOS with all the details without problems. However, no Windows or Linux system is able to boot with this disk connected.

I tried using URR, but the problem is the same – after few seconds the system stops responding. From time to time, I get a message that the NTFS partition is inappropriately closed and that the system will try to repair it. Even after showing this message, nothing actually happens, the CD drive stops spinning and the disk do not make any seek sounds.

The question is: am I able to boot without this disk, connect it then and mount it so that I could access and get the data using ddrescue? I am no Linux guy so I don't know whether the system will detect the disk automatically, but as lshw doesn't show it when I connect it AFTER the boot up, I presume I need to force some kind of detection. Could anyone help me, please? :-)

Hello. The URR would not try

Hello.

The URR would not try to repair the filesystem during boot - that would be very very bad - it must be another OS trying to do that at boot. Try to avoid that.

This is a very common problem and the way to get around it is to connect the drive using a USB (or other kind of hot-swappable) interface.

Remove the disk and boot the Rescue Remix. Check to see what drives you can see (to better identify them for later on):

cat /proc/partitions

Then connect the drive and watch the system messages:

tail -f /var/log/kern.log

If the new device is seen by the computer you will see a few messages come up. After a few seconds, if the drive is healthy enough, you will see something about a new device. Hit CTRL-C to get out of the tail command and run cat /proc/partitions again (hit cursor up twice at the command line to repeat previous commands you typed in)

If you see your drive among the listing, then you are good to go. Start imaging it. It has hardware issues and you need to image it onto a working drive before you can repair the filesystem on it.

Thank you, Andrew, for your

Thank you, Andrew, for your great help! I was finally able to get to this again, I connected the drive later via USB to SATA/PATA adapter, checked the disk initialized correctly as /dev/sdc(1), mounted another drive and using testdisk recovered the files I needed.

Just for the record, if anyone needed to do the same – I used Advanced > Boot > Copy option in testdisk to extract exactly the right files. Fortunately there was no need to mess up with whole disk image recovering.

I may also recommend cooling the faulty drive: during the first attempt the recovery froze, as the drive became quite warm, so I put a 120×120 mm fan right onto it and it worked like a charm.

PS: Be patient when using testdisk, some operations take a really long time with no visible activity. :-)

Thank you, Andrew, for your

Thank you, Andrew, for your great help! I was finally able to get to this again, I connected the drive later via USB to SATA/PATA adapter, checked the disk initialized correctly as /dev/sdc(1), mounted another drive and using testdisk recovered the files I needed.

Just for the record, if anyone needed to do the same – I used Advanced > Boot > Copy option in testdisk to extract exactly the right files. Fortunately there was no need to mess up with whole disk image recovering.

I may also recommend cooling the faulty drive: during the first attempt the recovery froze, as the drive became quite warm, so I put a 120×120 mm fan right onto it and it worked like a charm.

PS: Be patient when using testdisk, some operations take a really long time with no visible activity. :-)